September 17, 2021

NCL resumes cruises out of Miami

NCL’s Gem lines up at their new cruise terminal in Miami.

Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL), the innovator in global cruise travel, today celebrated two history making milestones for the Company: Norwegian Gem commenced voyages from the Company’s home city of Miami following a 17-month cruising suspension and the first guests were welcomed into its recently completed NCL Terminal at PortMiami.

Marking the third of the Company’s 17 ships to resume operations after Norwegian Jade from Athens on July 25, 2021 and Norwegian Encore from Seattle on Aug. 7, 2021, Norwegian Gem set sail today on a week-long voyage to the Caribbean with calls to Costa Maya and Cozumel, Mexico; Roatan, Honduras; and Harvest Caye, the Company’s private resort destination in Belize.

“It has been an exhilarating few weeks as we relaunch our fleet, reunite with our shipboard families and welcome our guests back for their long-awaited cruise vacations,” said Harry Sommer, president and chief executive officer of Norwegian Cruise Line. “I’ve been impressed and proud of how our global team and partners have come together to safely bring back cruising, an over $55 billion-dollar industry that positively impacts communities around the world.”

Sommer continued, “Today is even more special as it is the first time we are relaunching from our hometown and from the new NCL Terminal at PortMiami. After many months, we are ready to deliver a safe and memorable experience for our guests at every step of their cruise journey.”

Defining the Miami Skyline, the new NCL Terminal at PortMiami can accommodate cruise vessels carrying up to 5,000 cruise guests. The construction marvel was designed with sustainability at the forefront and was built to LEED Gold standards for optimizing energy, water efficiency, air quality and utilization of local materials and resources. In addition, approximately 90% of all subcontractors, vendors and suppliers were local to the region, reducing the carbon footprint of the project and encouraging local economic growth. Parent company Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. recently also announced a partnership with Miami-Dade County to make the new state-of-the-art cruise terminal “Shore-Power Ready” by fall 2023.
Constructed by NV2A Group and Haskell, and designed by the Miami-based firm of Bermello Ajamil & Partners Inc., the approximately 188,000-square-foot building draws inspiration from a nautilus, with its spiraled and multi-level façade, opening to grand ocean and city views with approximately 122,000 square feet of energy-saving glass features. Its artistically designed exterior is complemented by a carefully curated collection of art throughout the complex as part of Miami Dade County Art in Public Places, a program dedicated to enriching the public environment and to preserving and enhancing the artistic and civic pride of Miami-Dade County.

Norwegian Gem is scheduled to sail a series of week-long voyages to the Caribbean and four-day cruises to the Bahamas through Oct. 17, 2021 before repositioning to New York for five to 11-night voyages to the Bahamas, Caribbean and Bermuda.

HAL and Princess restart in Seattle

Holland America and Princess Cruises resume their voyages to Alaska.

SANTA CLARITA, Calif. (July 23, 2021) – To kick off their return to service in the U.S., Princess Cruises and Holland America Line held a celebration at the Port of Seattle today. Jan Swartz, president of Princess Cruises, and Gus Antorcha, president of Holland America Line, spoke to what the positive multidimensional impact the resumption of cruising means to Seattle, the local community and Alaska.

Holland America Line will kick off its Alaska season with Nieuw Amsterdam setting sail tomorrow, July 24, and Princess Cruises will follow with Majestic Princess sailing on July 25. Each line will operate ten cruises sailing out of Seattle through September. This marks the return to cruising and Alaska for both lines, which combined have more than 125 years of experience bringing cruisers to The Great Land. Historically, one in two guests who cruise to Alaska sail on Princess or Holland America.

Both cruise lines have been homeporting out of the Port of Seattle for more than 20 years. Operationally, each ship visit directly contributes more than $364,000 to the local economy in provisioning (fuel, food, flowers, piano tuning, supplies), port taxes, and spending during a full season.

Princess Cruises is the world’s leading international premium cruise line and tour company operating a fleet of 14 modern cruise ships to 380 destinations around the globe. Princess celebrates more than 50 years sailing to Alaska, bringing more guests to the Great Land than any other cruise line.

Holland America Line has been exploring the world since 1873 and was the first cruise line to offer adventures to Alaska and the Yukon nearly 75 years ago. Its fleet of premium ships visits more than 400 ports in 98 countries around the world, offering an ideal mid-sized ship experience.

CLIA makes statement on Venice

A ship the size of Queen Mary will no longer be allowed to dock in Venice.

Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) welcomes the decision by the Italian Government to allow for a long-awaited alternative route for cruise ships to access Venice.

The Italian government has banned large cruise ships from passing through the center of Venice, declaring the surrounding lagoon a national monument after years of international outcry over the liners causing permanent harm to the fragile city.

“Ships will no longer pass in front of St. Mark’s or the Giudecca Canal,” he said, referring to the route they traditionally take through the center of the city.

The law applies to ships weighing more than 25,000 tons, measuring more than 590 feet long, or more than 115 feet high.

“It is not going too far to define this day as historic,” said Culture Minister Dario Franceschini, adding that the decree would go into effect on August 1.

For several years, CLIA and its members have been supportive of the Government’s ambition to identify a long-awaited alternative water route to serve Venice. This decision has finally identified this alternative route and port.

The cruise industry has over the years cooperated with national and local authorities constructively throughout as authorities have searched for a sustainable solution to this long-standing and complex challenge.

Commenting on the announcement, Francesco Galietti, CLIA Italy National Director said:

“We are pleased that the Italian Government has taken this decision on an alternative route as the cruise industry has been supportive of a new approach for many years. The Government’s decision to appoint a special Commissioner to fast track the process is also a welcome development. We now look forward to progress being made towards the provision of alternative docking arrangements in time for the 2022 season.”

The cruise industry provides a significant contribution to national economies. In Italy alone, the cruise sector generates a turnover of €14 billion every year, supporting over 120,000 jobs (direct and indirect).

Canada to allow cruise ships Nov. 1st

Radiance of the Seas at Hubbard Glacier – Alaska
Radiance of the Seas – Royal Caribbean International

(Nadine El-Bawab CNBC) – Canada will allow cruise ships to operate in its waters starting Nov. 1 if operators comply fully with public health requirements, the country’s minister of transport announced on Thursday.

Earlier this year, the Canadian government had extended its ban on cruises until the end of February 2022. Speaking outside the Ogden Point Deep-Water Terminal in Victoria on Thursday, federal Transport Minister Omar Alghabra and B.C. Transportation Minister Rob Fleming said this would give cruise ship operators time to prepare for the 2022 cruise ship season.

“Our government is now ready to announce that we are accelerating the timeline for resuming cruise ship activity. I am announcing today that cruise ships will be allowed in Canadian waters as of November 1st of this year,” Alghabra said during a news conference.

Canada’s federal transportation department, in a statement Thursday, said it was ready to welcome back cruise ships earlier than anticipated due to the improved public health outlook in Canada as Covid cases drop and vaccinations increase.

The cruise industry brings in more than $4 billion annually for the Canadian economy, indirectly generates 30,000 jobs and is vital for the tourism sector, according to the transportation department.

This decision comes a week after Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made clear that the country will not let in unvaccinated tourists anytime soon, despite the hurting tourism sector.

And the restart of cruises will be dependent on the public health situation at any given time especially in areas where the cruises will dock, Alghabra said Thursday. The Canadian government is still advising citizens to avoid all travel on cruise ships outside the country, he said.

In the U.S., the cruise industry has been one of the last to return to pre-pandemic operations after several high-profile outbreaks on ships last year. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently allowed cruise operators to begin sailing again, with strict health protocols in place.

Canada and the U.S. extended the ban on non-essential travel across their land border until at least July 21.

 

Alaska gets ready for 2021 cruises

Cruise lines are bringing travellers back to Alaska.

By Heidi Groover, The Seattle Times

Cruises from Seattle to Alaska are set to return this summer after federal lawmakers cleared the way for sailings that have been on hold since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic.

The move signals the return of a significant slice of downtown Seattle’s economy, where some waterfront businesses plan staffing around the cruise schedule. But significant questions remain about exact safety protocols the cruise lines will enforce.

Princess Cruises, Holland America Line and Carnival Cruise Line said Thursday they would resume cruising to Alaska for a partial season starting in  late July for passengers who have proof of vaccination. Ports for most lines include Juneau, Ketchikan, and either Sitka or Skagway. Princess and HAL will usually cruise to Glacier Bay while Celebrity will tour Endicott Arm to view the Dawes Glacier.

Princess Cruises will sail seven-day cruises from July 25 through Sept. 26. Sales will begin on May 21.

Holland America Line will resume seven-day cruises to depart on Saturdays from July 24 through Oct. 2.

Carnival will depart weekly from July 27 to Sept. 14. Most trips will be seven-day cruises, with one eight-day trip that has one additional stop.

Norwegian Cruise Line has also started selling tickets for August sailings from Seattle to Alaska, the Associated Press reported Wednesday.

A spokesperson for Royal Caribbean Group, which includes Royal Caribbean, Celebrity Cruises and Silversea, said the company would release more details soon, but “we couldn’t be more excited to sail in Alaska this summer.”

Proof of vaccination will be required, the companies said Thursday. Decisions about masks, social distancing and precise quarantine procedures are still to come.

Cruise ships became early emblems of the pandemic when outbreaks aboard ships last year stranded crews and passengers on board for weeks. This spring, the CDC has been working on guidelines to allow cruise ships to resume operations.

For Seattle-Alaska sailings, the Port of Seattle will craft agreements with the cruise companies outlining safety protocols, including arrangements in the event of an outbreak on board “so it’s not a burden on the local government and community resources,” said Stephanie Jones Stebbins, the Port of Seattle’s maritime director.

The resumption of sailing is made possible by the recent passage of the Alaska Tourism Restoration Act, which will temporarily allow cruise lines to bypass Canada.

Many large cruise lines run ships that are registered outside the United States, and because of that are typically required to stop at a foreign port when traveling between two U.S. ports. (Cruise critics say the companies register outside the country to avoid taxes, labor laws and environmental regulations.) With Canada closed to cruise ships, that rule stood in the way of Seattle-to-Alaska trips.

After passage in the U.S. Senate last week, the U.S. House of Representatives approved the fix Thursday. The news set off a string of cruise lines announcing their plans to resume sailing to Alaska.

NCL applies to start sailing again from U.S. ports on July 4

The 169,000 ton Norwegian Encore.

(Reuters, Nivedita Balu) Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd said on Monday it had sought the approval of U.S. health authorities to restart trips from U.S. ports from July 4 with mandatory vaccinations for travelers, bringing new hope to the ravaged industry.

The company’s announcement follows the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s latest guidance last week to the cruise ship industry, including the need for COVID-19 vaccinations.

The move by CEO Frank Del Rio is a bold salvo amid the cruise industry’s escalating frustration with the CDC. Criticism has mounted since Friday, when the agency said travel for vaccinated people was low risk — but also laid out a raft of additional conditions, under a “conditional sailing order,” that cruise lines need to meet before getting permission to operate from U.S. ports.

“I’d like to hear an argument why we couldn’t sail,” Del Rio said in an interview with The Washington Post. “If everyone on board is vaccinated and following the protocols, there is absolutely no need for the conditional sail order to exist as it is known today.”

Del Rio made his case to the CDC in a letter dated Monday.

Frank Del Rio, chief executive officer of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd., has sought the approval of U.S. health authorities to restart trips from U.S. ports from July 4.
Frank Del Rio, chief executive officer of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd., has sought the approval of U.S. health authorities to restart trips from U.S. ports from July 4. PHOTO BY MARK ELIAS/BLOOMBERG
In the letter, Norwegian Cruise said that its plan was in line with the latest guideline and that it aimed to kick start trips at a 60% capacity starting July 4.

Norwegian also said it would increase the capacity by 20% every 30 days and ramp up departures from U.S. ports for its fleet of 28 ships spread across Norwegian Cruise Line, Oceania Cruises and Regent Seven Seas Cruises.

In addition to the vaccine requirement for passengers of all ages, the company will require negative coronavirus tests, face coverings, contactless food service and other measures.

“We believe that through a combination of 100% mandatory vaccinations … we can create a safe, ‘bubble-like’ environment for guests and crew,” Del Rio said.

Shares of Carnival, Norwegian Cruise and Royal Caribbean closed up between 3% and 7% on Monday.

While Carnival Corp noted that the latest guideline was “largely unworkable and stood in stark contrast to the approach taken in other travel and tourism sectors,” Royal Caribbean said it was “reviewing and studying” it.

In a statement, the CDC sounded unmoved by Del Rio’s request, reiterating the approach it has laid out in its order.

“Cruising safely and responsibly during a global pandemic is difficult,” the statement said. “While cruising will always pose some risk of COVID-19 transmission, following the phases of the conditional sailing order will ensure cruise ship passenger operations are conducted in a way that protects crew members, passengers, and port personnel; particularly, with emerging COVID-19 variants of concern.”

Other cruise lines have announced plans to start cruising again for Americans outside the United States – including the Bahamas, Bermuda, Caribbean and Greece. In most cases, those cruises will require either everyone on board or those 18 and older to be fully vaccinated.

The Cruise Lines International Association, which represents the three companies, also said the guidance was “burdensome and ambiguous” and urged for a controlled return to service this summer.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican, threatened to file a lawsuit if cruises continued to be blocked this summer, according to several media reports. Del Rio copied DeSantis and other elected officials from Florida, home to the world’s busiest cruise ports, on his letter.

With additional reporting from Hannah Sampson, The Washington Post

Urgent Need for Ships to Start Sailing, Says FMC

The U.S. Federal Marine Commission urges cruises to resume in Florida.

By Kenneth Griffin – (The Cruise Examiner) – Last week, the US Federal Marine Commission made its voice known in the world of cruising by backing a return to the seas by the mammoth worldwide fleet of cruise ships that has been laid up, but particularly those that traded from the previously busy ports of Florida.

A report issued by US Federal Maritime Commissioner Louis Sola says there is an urgent need for the cruise industry to resume sailing from Florida cruise ports, citing staggering losses to revenue, local employment and the contributions cruisers make to other tourism sectors such as the airline and hospitality industries.

In its latest, commissioner Sola indicates that Florida has lost $3.2 billion in economic activity and 49,500 local jobs paying approximately $2.3 billion in wages as a result of the suspension of cruising following the COVID-19 pandemic and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s No-Sail Order, in effect through September 30.

The report notes that Florida is home to the top-three cruise ports in the world, with 59% of all US embarkations taking place in 2018. Including the corporate and administrative staff of the cruise lines headquartered in Florida, the cruise industry was responsible for over 149,000 jobs in the state and $7.69 billion in wages.

The cruise industry produces in $8.49 billion in direct spending each year within Florida.
Sola said: “the financial consequences of laid-up cruise ships are being seen in government coffers and the pockets of working men and women. Across Florida, people recognize the vital necessity of the cruise industry contributing to the economy again.”

Losses for the 2020 cruise season have been staggering for some of Florida’s largest turnaround ports, which also include Port Everglades.

Before the pandemic, Miami welcomed 6.8 million cruise passengers, a world record. As Florida’s busiest cruise port, and one of the largest and busiest in the world, Miami is responsible for over 30,000 local jobs, $5.8 billion in economic value and $188 million in local and state taxes. Miami estimates it will tally a $55-million loss this year.

Losses for Port Canaveral are pegged at 79% of its annual passengers and 16,000 jobs. With no cruises sailing from the port since early March, though, the annual $1.3 billion that is contributed to the local economy by the cruise industry in Port Canaveral and its surrounding area is at high risk.

Nearly 13,000 people were employed directly by the cruise industry in Port Canaveral in 2019, a number that rises to 23,745 if indirect jobs are included as well.

In Key West — Florida’s only cruise port to function solely as a port of call — the cruise industry contributes over $85 million in economic benefits, provides 1,250 local jobs and makes up 15% of the city’s total tax revenue.

The suspension of the cruise industry within Florida also has an impact on other industries within the United States. Cruise passengers contributed nearly $2 billion in fares to the airline industry in 2019. They also contributed $1.1 billion to the local economy in Miami-Dade County from overnight hotel stays, food and beverage, shopping and transportation, etc.

Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez has also joined the FMC in voicing his concern that cruising activity should resume soon. The report notes that the Fact Finding 30 commission will also be assessing the economic impact of the loss of the cruise industry in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest next.

Cruise Industry has Plan to Return to Sea

Cruise ships in Miami during a normal turnaround weekend.

By Shannon McMahon, Washington Post

(Sept. 23, 2020) On the same day the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention withdrew updated covid-19 guidance stating that the coronavirus is airborne and can spread in poorly ventilated indoor spaces, a panel of experts assembled by cruise giants Royal Caribbean and Norwegian Cruise Line outlined its recommendations to the CDC for a potential safe return to cruising.

The guidelines, which were filed on the final day of a two-month CDC window for public comments relating to cruise ship travel, include a new focus on “air management” in addition to lower capacities, shorter sailings, required testing and masks, and enhanced cleanings and medical staff on voyages.

The Healthy Sail Panel, which was formed in July, includes epidemiologists, cruise executives and former heads of federal agencies. The panel on Monday recommended 74 general health and safety best practices to cruise lines that seek to operate again.

With these initial recommendations “the pathway to initial resumption is made more clear,” said Brian Salerno, the Cruise Lines International Association’s senior vice president of maritime policy, in a news conference following the release of the recommendations. In the news conference, cruise industry leaders outlined what they think a timeline for a return to cruising, which has already occurred in Europe, might look like in North America. Some said they hope some late-2020 sailings can be salvaged, despite the CDC’s current no-sail order through Sept. 30 and the voluntary cruise line suspensions in place through Oct. 31.

Cruises will have fewer passengers, more medical staff

Cruises have long been associated with their massive ship sizes, fitting thousands into floating cities. But a coronavirus-era cruise will have fewer people on board and will initially be shorter in terms of time spent at sea. The panel recommends “trip lengths of no more than ten days at first,” since cruises any longer “usually entail stops at several ports, and introducing this level of risk early in the return to service phase would be inadvisable.”

Crowd control will require both fewer passengers and more medical staff than past sailings, with the panel calling for “cruises to sail at reduced capacity once sailing resumes as a way to facilitate physical distancing” of at least six feet.

Carnival Corp. CEO Arnold Donald said also he expects to make modifications to certain cabins to create isolation rooms and potential “ICU” beds.

100 percent testing and mandatory masks

The aim of the new recommendations is to “maintain a healthy ‘bubble’ within which cruises can operate.” Cruise executives say testing 100 percent of passengers and crew before sailings will be key, with potential for retesting during sailings. Crew are required to isolate for seven days onboard before departure after receiving their negative test and should be retested before departure.

All passengers will be required to wear masks “whenever physical distancing cannot be maintained.”

You could be denied boarding (or re-boarding)

Shore excursions “must meet strict protocols agreed upon by cruise lines, health authorities, and destinations,” Adam Goldstein, CLIA global chair, said in a news conference about the recommendations on Monday. If cruisers don’t agree to the disembarkation terms of creating a bubble, or break that bubble, they won’t be permitted to sail.

The executive chairman of MSC Cruises, Pierfrancesco Vago, said “the resumption of cruising can take place in a healthy and safe way” with protocols like those enacted in Italy, where MSC has already resumed cruising and recently made headlines for removing bubble-breaking passengers.

New focus on air quality

Increasing fresh air and using newer ventilation systems is also a focus of the panel’s recommendations. Ships should “use a variety of indoor air management strategies aimed at reducing occupant exposure to infectious droplets/aerosols,” it states. “All cruise operators should upgrade the HVAC systems on their ships to, ideally, MERV 13 filters to minimize pathogen dispersal from infected guests and crew.”

The panel recommends that cruise operators pay special attention to areas where individuals would be most vulnerable to airborne transmission, like indoor common areas, and prioritize increasing the number of air changes per hour in those areas. “More specifically, isolation rooms in medical facilities on board should have six to 12 air changes per hour.”

U.S. cruise lines are eager to sail before the end of the year, if it’s safe

When cruise executives were asked about their timeline for a return to cruising, they both stressed the need for safety first and a hope to begin sailing later this year. CLIA president and CEO Kelly Craighead told reporters that the organization is hopeful some late-2020 sailings could depart if the CDC lifts its no-sail order by Nov. 1.

Cruise line CEOs were more measured. “When I think about resuming cruise operations I think about my elderly mother and my young children” being onboard, Norwegian Cruise Line CEO Frank Del Rio said. He plans to take his family on the first Norwegian Cruise to sail. “We are very confident that the procedures … will allow us to cruise safely, but we’ve not put a time factor on it.”

Similar to tourism reopenings, slow and steady phases of capacity and health protocols will mark any return to cruising: The Healthy Sails Panel highlights “a formal process to review health and safety experiences related to covid-19 on cruises to enhance best practices and shared learnings for continuous improvement.” Included in that phasing is the potential for capacity to be gradually increased “as conditions permit.”

The World Travel and Tourism Council estimates that 197 million travel and tourism jobs could be lost by end of year, amounting to $5.5 trillion dollars of the world’s GDP, WTTC spokesperson Gloria Guevara said. Donald said cruise lines would likely need 30 days after receiving CDC permission to train staff, acquire testing equipment and enact changes on ships before departures can begin.

Holland America Pauses Ship Operations for another 30 Days

Holland America Line announces new 30-day pause in ship operations.

Due to the continued port closures and travel restrictions surrounding global health concerns, Holland America Line has made the decision to extend its pause of global cruise operations for an additional 30 days, cancelling sailings scheduled to depart through May 14, 2020.

Guests currently booked on cruises from April 14 through May 14 and their travel advisors will receive notification from Holland America Line in the coming days regarding options for selecting either a Future Cruise Credit for 125% of their booking value plus an additional $250 shipboard credit or a full refund.

“As the world addresses global health concerns, travel has come to a temporary standstill as communities take necessary precautions to protect themselves,” said Orlando Ashford, president of Holland America Line. “All of us at Holland America Line are wishing everyone the best during this unprecedented time.”

All bookings will automatically be cancelled through May 14. Guests do not need to call to cancel, however, they may visit hollandamerica.com to indicate their preference for a 125% Future Cruise Credit with the bonus $250 shipboard credit or 100% refund. Holland America Line will reimburse cancellation fees for air and other arrangements for travel to and from the cancelled cruise. (This does not apply to chartered sailings.)

Holland America Line kindly requests that all those booked on cruises from April 14 through May 14 do not call reservations for assistance as hold times are expected to be very long, and their booking will automatically be cancelled over the coming week.

Recognizing the vital role travel advisors play in the success of the cruise industry, Holland America Line will protect travel advisor commissions on bookings for cancelled cruises that were paid in full and for the total amount of the Future Cruise Credits when guests rebook.

Cruise Lines take a 30-day breather

Cruise Lines International announces a 30-day pause in cruising.

Washington, DC (13 March 2020)—CLIA ocean-going cruise lines will be voluntarily and temporarily suspending cruise ship operations from and to U.S. ports of call for 30 days as public health officials and the U.S. Government continue to address COVID-19.

“CLIA cruise line members are voluntarily and temporarily suspending operations from the U.S. as we work to address this public health crisis,” said Kelly Craighead, President and CEO, CLIA. “This is an unprecedented situation. Our industry has taken responsibility for protecting public health for more than 50 years, working under the guidance of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and prides itself on its ability to deliver exceptional vacation experiences for guests, as well as meaningful employment opportunities for crew. This has been a challenging time, but we hope that this decision will enable us to focus on the future and a return to normal as soon as possible.”

The temporary suspension will take effect at 12:00AM EST on 14 March 2020. CLIA ocean-going cruise lines are focused on the safe and smooth return of those currently at sea onboard ships that will be affected by this decision.

“We do not take this decision lightly, and we want the traveling public to know in no uncertain terms the commitment of this industry to putting people first,” said Adam Goldstein, CLIA Global Chairman. “During this time, we will continue to work with the CDC and others to prepare for resumption of sailings when it is appropriate. We know the travel industry is a huge economic engine for the United States and when our ships once again sail, our industry will be a significant contributor to fueling the economic recovery.”

The cruise industry is a vital artery for the U.S. economy, supporting over 421,000 American jobs, with every 30 cruisers supporting one U.S. job, and annually contributes nearly $53 billion to the U.S. economy. Cruise activity supports travel agencies, airlines, hotels and a broad supply chain of industries that stretches across the United States.

Guests who are booked on cruise itineraries which will be impacted by this decision are encouraged to contact their travel advisors or reach out to their cruise lines directly. For additional information, please contact press@cruising.org.